Skip repeated menu and go directly to contents
Loading

Graduate Programs Requirements

Choose a Program

These seven core courses will provide a solid foundation in each of the key business disciplines. Please note that the core courses have been updated with new numbers and names beginning Fall 2014.

Old Courses New Courses
BA 650 Financial Reporting & Analysis I BA 625 Financial and Management Accounting
BA 651 Organizational Behavior BA 624 Organizational Behavior and Leadership
BA 652 Statistical Analysis BA 623 Statistical Analysis
BA 653 Managerial Economics BA 626 Business Economics
BA 655 Marketing BA 627 Marketing
BA 662 Operations Management BA 628 Operations and Supply Chain Management
BA 665 Financial Management I BA 629 Financial Management

Once you have been admitted to the MBA program, you must take the graduate-level core course. It is advisable for students to take the core classes as early as possible during their studies at SDSU. You may not be able to enroll in certain graduate level courses until you have completed a core course.

  1. A. Corporate Responsibility:

    These courses aim to help you develop a deep understanding and appreciation of the legal, ethical and social context in which management decisions are made. You will consider businesses' legal, social and ethical responsibilities to internal and external stakeholders such as stockholders, employees, customers, and the communities where the corporation does business.

    Choose ONE of the following courses:

    • ACCTG 681 Seminar in Regulatory & Management Controls
    • FIN 604 Legal Environment for Executives
    • MIS 755 Information Systems Security Management
    • MGT 722 Seminar in Business Ethics and Social Institutions
    • MGT 746 Seminar in Corporate Governance
  2. B. Management of Technology:

    These courses aim to develop an understanding of the key issues and trends in business' use of technology and data, information, and knowledge for decision making and competitive advantage.

    Choose ONE of the following courses:

    • MIS 688 Information Systems in Organizations
    • MIS 691 Decision Support Systems

All students are required to complete a total of 18 elective units. If all core classes were waived, a total of 21 elective units must be completed. Earning an MBA Specialization is optional. Students who wish to specialize in a specific area of study will be required to take a minimum of 12 units (four classes) in their chosen area of emphasis. Students may specialize in only one area of study. For a listing of the specific courses recommended for each of the specializations, please visit the links provided below.

Students who do not intend to specialize in one area of study or who want to take classes outside their area of emphasis will take graduate level business electives of their choosing. Electives are considered to be any 500-level or above course in the College of Business departments (Accountancy, Finance, Management, Marketing, and Management Information Systems). Please note that students may take a maximum of six units of 500-level courses. All additional units must be taken in 600-level or higher courses.

MBA students are given the option to either take the capstone course for the MBA program (BA 795) or complete a thesis (BA 799A).

Students who choose to take BA 795 should submit the BA 795 Reservation Form (doc) to Graduate Business Programs office by the fifth week in the semester prior to their anticipated graduation date.

Information on the thesis option is available on the Graduate Affairs web site: http://gra.sdsu.edu/grad/thesisProcedures.html

A. Maintain Required Grade Point Average

Grade point averages of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained in:

  1. All courses listed on the official program of study
  2. All courses, 300-level and above, taken at San Diego State University concurrently with or subsequently to the earliest course listed on the official degree program, including courses accepted for transfer credit

Note: No transfer or extension credit may be used to improve the grade point average of units completed at San Diego State University whether computed to determine the average on the official degree program or the overall average.

B. Submit Program of Study (POS)

All students must submit a POS worksheet to the Graduate Business Programs office no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating. For example, if a student plans to graduate in spring 2015, they should submit their POS no later than the fall 2014 semester. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA and be in good academic standing with the university in the semester in which they are submitting their POS. The POS must be filed before the student can be advanced to candidacy. The university requires students to be advanced to candidacy no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating.

The university Graduate Affairs office will review the POS, approve or deny the POS, and notify the student of the approval or denial. POS' are rarely denied. Once a POS has been approved it becomes the student's contract with the university that ensures that the student is meeting the requirements of the degree program.

C. Submit Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements (if needed)

If for any reason the student has taken courses that were not listed on the POS, the student will need to submit a Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements to update the POS that is on file with the university. Under the "Student Request" section, the student should list the courses they wish to have removed from their program of study as well as those that should be added to their program of study and provide a reason for the changes. The full name and number of each course and the number of units awarded for each course should be listed. MBA students should submit the completed form directly to the Graduate Business Programs office.

D. Submit Graduation Application

Students who have been advanced to candidacy and are ready to graduate need to complete an Application for Graduation with an Advanced Degree. The completed Application for Graduation should be submitted along with the $55 graduation fee via the SDSU Web Portal system in the Student Accounts area. The Graduation Application deadline varies but applications are usually due at the beginning of each semester. Students are advised to monitor the Graduate Affairs website and/or the Academic Calendar for the graduation application deadline in the semester they plan to graduate.

MBA Program of Study

MBA Program POS Fall 2013 and Prior (pdf)

MBA Sample Degree Plans

Working 40 Hours (pdf)

Working 20-30 Hours (pdf)

Working 0-20 Hours (pdf)

These eight core courses will provide a solid foundation in each of the key business disciplines. Students who have earned a bachelor's degree in a business-related field may have the opportunity to waive one core course with prior approval from their Graduate Advisor. A second core class may also be waived if a student successfully passes the relevant Challenge Exam. Speak with an advisor for more information.

  • BA 623 Statistical Analysis
  • BA 624 Organizational Behavior and Leadership
  • BA 625 Financial and Management Accounting
  • BA 626 Business Economics
  • BA 627 Marketing
  • BA 628 Operations and Supply Chain Management
  • BA 629 Financial Management
  • BA 630 Business Strategy

All students are required to complete a total of 18 elective units. Earning an MBA Specialization is optional. Students who wish to specialize in a specific area of study will be required to take a minimum of 12 units (four classes) in their chosen area of emphasis. Students may specialize in only one area of study. Please note, the available specializations and specific requirements will be updated during the Fall 2014 semester and will be listed here.

MBA students are given the option to either take the Business Consulting course (BA 795), the Integrative Business Analysis Course (BA 796), or complete a thesis (BA 799A). Students who choose to take BA 795 should submit the BA 795 Reservation Form (doc) to Graduate Business Programs office by the fifth week in the semester prior to their anticipated graduation date. Information on the thesis option is available on the Graduate Affairs web site: http://gra.sdsu.edu/grad/thesisProcedures.html

A. Maintain Required Grade Point Average

Grade point averages of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained in:

  1. All courses listed on the official program of study
  2. All courses, 300-level and above, taken at San Diego State University concurrently with or subsequently to the earliest course listed on the official degree program, including courses accepted for transfer credit

Note: No transfer or extension credit may be used to improve the grade point average of units completed at San Diego State University whether computed to determine the average on the official degree program or the overall average.

B. Submit Program of Study (POS)

All students must submit a POS worksheet to the Graduate Business Programs office no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating. For example, if a student plans to graduate in spring 2015, they should submit their POS no later than the fall 2014 semester. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA and be in good academic standing with the university in the semester in which they are submitting their POS. The POS must be filed before the student can be advanced to candidacy. The university requires students to be advanced to candidacy no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating.

The university Graduate Affairs office will review the POS, approve or deny the POS, and notify the student of the approval or denial. POS' are rarely denied. Once a POS has been approved it becomes the student's contract with the university that ensures that the student is meeting the requirements of the degree program.

C. Submit Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements (if needed)

If for any reason the student has taken courses that were not listed on the POS, the student will need to submit a Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements to update the POS that is on file with the university. Under the "Student Request" section, the student should list the courses they wish to have removed from their program of study as well as those that should be added to their program of study and provide a reason for the changes. The full name and number of each course and the number of units awarded for each course should be listed. MBA students should submit the completed form directly to the Graduate Business Programs office.

D. Submit Graduation Application

Students who have been advanced to candidacy and are ready to graduate need to complete an Application for Graduation with an Advanced Degree. The completed Application for Graduation should be submitted along with the $55 graduation fee via the SDSU Web Portal system in the Student Accounts area. The Graduation Application deadline varies but applications are usually due at the beginning of each semester. Students are advised to monitor the Graduate Affairs website and/or the Academic Calendar for the graduation application deadline in the semester they plan to graduate.

MBA Program of Study

MBA Program POS Fall 2014 and After (pdf)

MBA Sample Degree Plans

Working 40 Hours (pdf)

Working 20-30 Hours (pdf)

Working 0-20 Hours (pdf)

MSA Program Requirements

The Master of Science in Accountancy (MSA) degree is open to students with bachelor's degrees in any discipline. The MSA program requires students complete at least ten courses (30 semester units) beyond the core business/accounting classes. Students who have fulfilled the core business prerequisites can generally complete the program in 12-18 months. Students without prior academic studies in accounting and business can expect to spend 18-24 months in the program. Official MSA Programs of Study (POS) are determined by an MSA Advisor based on individual student goals. Contact an MSA Advisor for more information.

Visit the BMAcc web page for information about the BS/MS 4+1 Degree Program (BMAcc)

In addition to completing the 10 classes for a particular MSA specialization, students must complete specific core business classes.

SDSU Graduate Business Program may waive the core business classes for students coming into the program with undergraduate equivalents to the courses listed below.

Students must complete all core business courses prior to enrolling in accountancy courses numbered 650 and above. The following table provides a list of the core business courses for the MSA program:

MSA Requirement Equivalent Courses*
*100 and 200 level equivalent courses may be taken at community college.
BA 623 Statistical Analysis STAT 119 Statistical Analysis or
ECON 201 Statistical Methods
BA 624 Organizational Behavior & Leadership MGT 350 Management and Organizational Behavior
BA 625 Financial & Management Accounting
(Must take prior to ACCTG 620 and ACCTG 681)
ACCTG 201 Financial Accounting Fundamentals
ACCTG 202 Managerial Accounting Fundamentals
BA 626 Business Economics FIN 321 Managerial Economics or
ECON 101 Principles of Macroeconomics &
ECON 102 Principles of Microeconomics
BA 629 Financial Management FIN 323 Fundamentals of Finance
(Must take prior to ACCTG 620 and ACCTG 681)
English Proficiency: Writing or composition course at a university where English is the primary language of instruction.

AIS

Janie Chang, SSE 2411, (619) 594-8383, jchang@mail.sdsu.edu

Financial Reporting

(students with last names A-M)

Damon Fleming, SSE 3445, (619) 594-6347, dfleming@mail.sdsu.edu

(students with last names N-Z)

Gun-Ho Joh, SSE 2437, (619) 594-2716, Gun.Joh@sdsu.edu

Tax

Gene Whittenburg, SSE 2433, (619) 594-5693, gwhitten@mail.sdsu.edu

General Advisors

(students with last names A-M)

Sarah Mercado, EBA 448, (619) 594-1008, sarah.mercado@sdsu.edu

(students with last names N-Z)

Kristie Dock, EBA 448, (619) 594-4188, kdock@mail.sdsu.edu

Accounting Information Systems (AIS)

The MSA-AIS specialization provides students with an academic curriculum that integrates accounting and information systems. MSA-IS students developed the knowledge and skills to become accountants with expertise in information systems and business process management. The MSA-AIS specialization is designed primarily for students interested in pursuing careers in AIS related positions in internal audit, assurance services, information technology auditing, and consulting. The MSA-AIS specialization prepares students to take the Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) exam, the Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) exam, and the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam.

AI Specialization Overview (pdf)

Financial Reporting (FR)

The MSA-FR specialization provides students with an academic curriculum that focuses on enhancing the quality of information for business decision-making, with an emphasis on developing the communication and problem-solving skills to responsibly contribute to financial reporting processes. MSA-FR students develop a framework for financial reporting grounded in the principles of measurement, disclosure, control, and assurance. Students also have the flexibility to explore topics such as financial statement analysis, accounting theory and research, accounting information systems, corporate finance, and assurance services that transcend traditional financial statement audits. The MSA-FR specialization is designed primarily for students interested in pursuing financial reporting careers in assurance services and corporate industry, although it is flexible enough to allow students to customize their graduate accounting coursework to meet specific career objectives. The MSA-FR specialization prepares students to take the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam, Certified Management Accountant (CMA) exam, and Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exam.

FR Specialization Overview (pdf)

Taxation (TAX)

The MSA-TAX specialization provides students with an academic curriculum that incorporates a wide variety of topics and issues predominately focused on U.S. Federal income taxation. MSA-TAX students develop knowledge and skills in tax compliance and planning for individuals, corporations, partnerships (and other business entities), multistate taxation, international taxation, tax research, and financial reporting for income taxes. The MSA-TAX specialization is designed primarily for students interested in pursuing taxation related careers in public accounting firms and corporate industry. MSA-TAX specialization prepares students to take the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam and Enrolled Agent (EA) exam.

Tax Specialization Overview (pdf)

A. Maintain Required Grade Point Average

Grade point averages of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained in:

  1. All courses listed on the official program of study
  2. All courses, 300-level and above, taken at San Diego State University concurrently with or subsequently to the earliest course listed on the official degree program, including courses accepted for transfer credit

Note: No transfer or extension credit may be used to improve the grade point average of units completed at San Diego State University whether computed to determine the average on the official degree program or the overall average.

B. Submit Program of Study (POS)

All students must submit a POS worksheet to the Graduate Business Programs office no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating. For example, if a student plans to graduate in spring 2015, they should submit their POS no later than the fall 2014 semester. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA and be in good academic standing with the university in the semester in which they are submitting their POS. The POS must be filed before the student can be advanced to candidacy. The university requires students to be advanced to candidacy no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating.

The university Graduate Affairs office will review the POS, approve or deny the POS, and notify the student of the approval or denial. POS' are rarely denied. Once a POS has been approved it becomes the student's contract with the university that ensures that the student is meeting the requirements of the degree program.

C. Submit Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements (if needed)

If for any reason the student has taken courses that were not listed on the POS, the student will need to submit a Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements to update the POS that is on file with the university. Under the "Student Request" section, the student should list the courses they wish to have removed from their program of study as well as those that should be added to their program of study and provide a reason for the changes. The full name and number of each course and the number of units awarded for each course should be listed. MBA students should submit the completed form directly to the Graduate Business Programs office.

D. Submit Graduation Application

Students who have been advanced to candidacy and are ready to graduate need to complete an Application for Graduation with an Advanced Degree. The completed Application for Graduation should be submitted along with the $55 graduation fee via the SDSU Web Portal system in the Student Accounts area. The Graduation Application deadline varies but applications are usually due at the beginning of each semester. Students are advised to monitor the Graduate Affairs website and/or the Academic Calendar for the graduation application deadline in the semester they plan to graduate.

MSIS Program Requirements

Flexible Curriculum

The MSIS program is designed to be flexible, so you can learn what you need to build the career you want. Your program of study can be adjusted to account for your background and experience. The curriculum includes a "career track" element – an opportunity to customize your course work to align with your career goals. There are several "career track" options suggested below, but if you have a particular technology or domain interest you can work with your academic adviser to define a customized career-track emphasis. This can include courses from the College of Business Administration or other Colleges across the SDSU campus.

In addition to the required courses in the programs, students must complete the following pre-requisite courses. If you have professional expertise or equivalent preparation, you may waive these courses with the approval of your adviser.

Course Number Course Title Units
MIS 180 Principles of Information Systems 3
MIS 315 Business Applications Programming 3
BA 625 Financial and Management Accounting 3
BA 627 Marketing 3
BA 628 Operations and Supply Chain Management 3

Courses in the Program

After satisfying the prerequisites, you must complete a graduate program of at least 36 approved units, including at least 27 units in 600- and 700-numbered courses. Up to nine units of coursework may be accepted as transfer credit. Not more than three units of MIS 797 and MIS 798 (special study) may be accepted toward credit for the degree.

Required Core Courses (24 Units)

The following core courses in the Information Systems Technology area are required:

Course Number Course Title Units
MIS 686 Database Management Systems 3
MIS 687 Data Communications and Distributed Data Processing 3
MIS 695 Information Systems Development I 3
MIS 697 Information Systems Development II 3
MIS 752 Seminar in Supply Chain Processing and Control 3
IS TECHNOLOGY UNITS (TOTAL): 15

The following core courses in the Information Systems Management area are required:

Course Number Course Title Units
MIS 688 Information Systems in Organizations 3
MIS 750 Project Management 3
MIS 755 Information Systems Security Management 3
IS MANAGEMENT UNITS (TOTAL): 9

With the approval of your MSIS adviser, you may substitute a different course for a required course after a review of your credentials and experience.

Career Track Courses (9 Units)

Working with your adviser, you will decide on a career-track interest and design your program of study to include courses relevant to your career objectives. These courses can be from within the College of Business Administration or from other colleges at SDSU. (See the section Career Tracks below for a description of several suggested career track options.)

Complete Plan A or Plan B Courses (3 Units)

You must complete either Plan A (thesis option) or Plan B (directed readings and comprehensive examination). You will take one of the following courses, depending on which option you choose. Your adviser will assist you in determining the best choice for you.

Plan Course Number Course Title Units
A BA 799A Thesis Research 3
B MIS 790 Directed Readings in MIS 3
PLAN A OR PLAN B UNITS (TOTAL): 3

The ability to direct your program of study toward an area of interest to you is a key feature of the MSIS program. As noted above, nine units of study are to be chosen based on a career or domain interest that you determine in consultation with your adviser.

The following suggested career tracks are provided to assist you in planning your program of study. You may follow one of these tracks or create a program tailored to your own objectives.

Business Analytics

A business-analytics career track is focused on leveraging the information and knowledge assets of an organization to make better decisions and uncovering hidden or unnoticed relationships that can lead to a more effective competitive strategy for the firm.

Information Security

A career in information security focuses on analyzing threat models, deploying appropriate countermeasures, and implementing controls to ensure end-to-end oversight of the organizations critical information and knowledge assets.

Supply Chain and Operations

The supply-chain and operations-management career track focuses on the management activities of designing, planning, executing, controlling of supply chain and operational activities to sustain an organization's competitive position. The goal is to synchronize supply and demand decisions strategically to serve the global marketplace.

Enterprise Systems

Enterprise application architects construct models of an organization's information assets and assign functional capabilities to various hardware, software, and human assets. The focus is on developing a long-term strategy for integrating legacy systems with new technologies and capturing business processes in a maintainable and scalable structure. Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems frequently form the nucleus of the modern enterprise architecture.

Project Management

Project managers plan and oversee the development, deployment and adoption of information systems in the enterprise. They are the principal point of responsibility for ensuring that the firm's IS investments are delivered on time and within budget.

Geographic Information Systems

A specialist in GIS makes use of statistics, database technology, computer graphics, and cartography to create systems that store, manage and facilitate analysis of geographically referenced data. Such systems are widespread for use in marketing, resource management, logistics, research, and many other functions that rely on geographically distinguished information.

Health Information Systems

The health-care industry is undergoing a transformation toward integrated and automated medical records and operations. A career track in HIS focuses on the technical, legal, and ethical aspects of health-care information storage and delivery systems.

E-Government

A career track in e-government issues focuses on the unique challenges faced by federal, state and local governments in integrating and automating their operations. Such systems facilitate government-to-citizen, government-to-business, government-to-employee, and government-to-government transactions.

IT Auditing

An career in IT auditing involves examining and reinforcing the management controls within an organization's information infrastructure with the goal of safeguarding assets, maintaining data integrity, and ensuring the integrity of the knowledge base that guides the strategic direction of the enterprise.

Management Information Systems

(students with last names A-M)

Alex Koster, SSE 3112, (619) 594-1020, akoster@mail.sdsu.edu

(students with last names N-Z)

Bongsik Shin, SSE 3118, (619) 594-2133, bshin@mail.sdsu.edu

A. Maintain Required Grade Point Average

Grade point averages of at least 3.0 (B) must be maintained in:

  1. All courses listed on the official program of study
  2. All courses, 300-level and above, taken at San Diego State University concurrently with or subsequently to the earliest course listed on the official degree program, including courses accepted for transfer credit

Note: No transfer or extension credit may be used to improve the grade point average of units completed at San Diego State University whether computed to determine the average on the official degree program or the overall average.

B. Submit Program of Study (POS)

All students must submit a POS worksheet to the Graduate Business Programs office no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating. For example, if a student plans to graduate in spring 2015, they should submit their POS no later than the fall 2014 semester. Students must have at least a 3.0 GPA and be in good academic standing with the university in the semester in which they are submitting their POS. The POS must be filed before the student can be advanced to candidacy. The university requires students to be advanced to candidacy no later than the semester before they anticipate graduating.

The university Graduate Affairs office will review the POS, approve or deny the POS, and notify the student of the approval or denial. POS' are rarely denied. Once a POS has been approved it becomes the student's contract with the university that ensures that the student is meeting the requirements of the degree program.

C. Submit Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements (if needed)

If for any reason the student has taken courses that were not listed on the POS, the student will need to submit a Petition for Adjustment of Academic Requirements to update the POS that is on file with the university. Under the "Student Request" section, the student should list the courses they wish to have removed from their program of study as well as those that should be added to their program of study and provide a reason for the changes. The full name and number of each course and the number of units awarded for each course should be listed. MBA students should submit the completed form directly to the Graduate Business Programs office.

D. Submit Graduation Application

Students who have been advanced to candidacy and are ready to graduate need to complete an Application for Graduation with an Advanced Degree. The completed Application for Graduation should be submitted along with the $55 graduation fee via the SDSU Web Portal system in the Student Accounts area. The Graduation Application deadline varies but applications are usually due at the beginning of each semester. Students are advised to monitor the Graduate Affairs website and/or the Academic Calendar for the graduation application deadline in the semester they plan to graduate.

Specialized Programs (self-support)

The program curriculum offers an integrated blend of theory and practice, and provides a general management emphasis well-suited to your needs as a mid-career executive. Courses are structured sequentially so that faculty can build upon the concepts and skills presented in preceding courses. Teaching methodologies vary with subject matter and may include classroom lectures, outside reading, case discussions, simulations, and individual and small group projects. Many course assignments allow you to immediately apply concepts to situations in your own organizations.

A total of 48 units of course work is required for the degree. First-year courses develop a solid foundation in traditional business disciplines and introduce you to the core principles. Second-year course work creates an awareness of the environments in which businesses operate, provides a comprehensive understanding of organizations, develops the skills essential to working successfully with people in organizations, and provides a strategic context for business decision making.

First Year Courses

  • Management of Organizations and Human Resources
  • Statistics for Business Decisions
  • Executive Financial Accounting
  • Executive Managerial Accounting
  • Managerial Marketing
  • Strategic Financial Management
  • Competitive Analysis
  • Business in the Global Environment

Second Year Courses

  • Executive Entrepreneurship
  • Social Responsibility: Business Law
    Legal and Ethical Environment of Business
  • Strategic Management
  • Marketing Strategy
  • Seminar in Executive Negotiations
  • The Global Financial Environment
  • Executive Leadership
  • New Product Innovation
    Corporate Governance
  • Launching a High-Risk Business

Schedule: Designed to Fit Your Busy Life

We understand how busy your schedule can be. Therefore, the EMBA program courses are scheduled to make the most efficient use of your time. Classes meet from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays, approximately every other week for 21 months.

Visit the EMBA Academics page for more details on the schedule.

The curriculum is composed of core MBA courses tailored to the sports industry; a set of sports industry-specific courses selected to meet the demands of the modern sports marketplace; and a 6-month, full-time consulting project with a sports organization that meets the student's career goals.

The most valuable feature of the SDSU Sports MBA program is the core MBA curriculum provided for the students, as this program is an AACSB accredited graduate business degree. The MBA core courses are business focused, heavily quantitative, and taught by some of the top faculty within the SDSU College of Business Administration. When applicable, members of the faculty cater the presentation of traditional business concepts to sports business, and provide students with analytical tools applicable to the sports industry. While laying the foundation of a solid graduate business education, these courses are supplemented with sports-specific case studies and executive guest lecturers drawn from sports organizations.

Courses and Descriptions

Students in Dr. David DeBoskey's course are given an all-around, intense education in financial accounting. The class begins with basic accounting principles and progresses to deeper analyses of financial statements. Dr. DeBoskey guides students through the process of understanding the language of accounting with the expectation that they finish the course capable of making sound financial decisions in future professional situations.

Dr. Amy Randel challenges the SMBA cohort to think critically about all aspects of interpersonal communication in the workplace. After introducing the class to the various theories and strategies associated with successful leadership, students study the management practices of local sports-related businesses and provide analysis and feedback based on their research. Past projects have included companies such as SkinIt, Bamboo Skate, US Olympic Training Center, and the San Diego Padres.

Statistical Analysis, taught by former Associate Dean Dr. Jim Lackritz, introduces new SMBA students to the principles of statistics as they apply to sports business. Students in this intensive course are expected both run and interpret statistical information in sports-specific contexts to mimic real life decision-making processes used by leaders in the industry. Dr. Lackritz combines his own research in sports business with texts like Moneyball to provide SMBA students with the foundation for critical thought in the sports industry.

Students in sports economics are taught by Dr. David Ely to use microeconomic principles to make and defend decisions in the sports industry. The course includes vibrant debates on the subject of the students' choosing. Each team must support its position on a sports-related subject using economic reasoning and principles. Discussion topics include stadium financing, player salaries, and athlete representation.

The first portion of this two-part class is taught by visiting professor Dr. Vassilis Dalakas, who provides a thorough introduction to key marketing principles as they apply to sports business. Interactive lectures combined with in-depth case study analyses prepare students to submit their own original marketing proposals at the end of the class.

The second part is taught by industry expert Dan Bruton, who draws on his extensive experience in the sports industry to teach students about sports marketing, particularly as it relates to licensing. Throughout the course, students participate in mini case competitions at the end of each lecture to simulate the fast-paced decision-making necessary to succeed in sports marketing. The class culminates with group presentations to industry professionals about various licensing challenges.

Dr. Bruce Reinig teaches a broad range of topics relating to the management of operations and supply chains. These include modeling tradeoffs between service levels, costs, and efficiencies in project scheduling, inventory management, and queue management. Students will learn hands-on techniques for quality management, including statistical process control, and for demand forecasting, all placed in the context of sports management. Special attention is given to contemporary issues in sports management such as sustainability initiatives and analytics. Past courses have included hand-on demonstrations of SAP software.

SMBA students begin their Financial Management I course with the goal of learning the basic foundation of the principles of corporate finance, as taught by Professor Frank Ryan. Applying recently-acquired knowledge from their accounting class, students learn about the decision-making processes that shape balance sheets and income statements. Once the groundwork has been laid, students apply these principles to analyze sports business topics such as franchise valuation and stadium financing.

While students complete the bulk of the core MBA in their first semester, the summer session and fall semester courses feature a more sports-focused classroom experience with a heavy emphasis on developing practical skills designed to be implemented once the student enters the industry as a graduate consultant in the final semester. During this portion of the program, a number of guest lecturers and visiting industry professionals work with students to complement the syllabi of courses taught by SDSU College of Business faculty.

In Frank Ryan's second course within the Sports MBA curriculum, students build upon the foundation set by Financial Management I. They are expected to understand the impetus behind major financial deals in the sports world, such as stadium financing and franchise valuation. In order to prepare students for tasks they will face in the sports industry, this course is heavily based in Excel.

SMBA students work with a visiting faculty member for an immersion into sports law and how it relates to the owners, agents, sponsors and athletes who operate in the sports industry. The course covers nearly all aspects of sports business, including league structures, collective bargaining agreements, player compensation, and college athletics, among other topics. As part of this in-depth course, students are paired off to participate in a simulated player contract negotiation.

The highlight of Global HR Management, taught by SDSU College of Business Administration Associate Dean Dr. Gangaram Singh, is Sports MBA's annual trip to the San Diego Padres training facility in the Dominican Republic. Prior to departure, students learn about global human resource practices and the challenges that can arise when companies choose to send expatriates abroad. Once on the ground in the Dominican Republic, students apply that knowledge to develop suggestions that would allow Major League Baseball to see greater personal and professional success from its Dominican players. The course concludes back in San Diego with a simulated collective bargaining agreement negotiation.

Dr. John Francis leads this course, which studies the globalization of sports with an emphasis on the theories and trends that shape the evolving relationships between the international environment and sports organizations. The complexities of national and regional politics, economies and cultures produce both opportunities and challenges for firms operating across national boundaries. This course intends to provide students with a broad view of these relevant and comparative differences with an emphasis on understanding their impact on the nature of international sports management.

This course focuses on the development, implementation and evaluation of marketing strategy for sports organizations and companies. The emphasis will be on developing skills and gaining experience in making strategic decisions regarding the direction of the firm's marketing efforts. Attention is also focused on how strategic marketing contributes to the development and implementation of an organizations overall business strategy.

This course is taught by marketing professor Dr. Andrew Baker and focuses on making students both excellent consumers and producers of marketing research. Students learn all major steps of the marketing research process:

  1. how to identify business problems and research questions
  2. designing a marketing research project
  3. implementing a marketing research plan
  4. analyzing and presenting the research in order to enhance managerial decision-making

All steps of the research process are also conducted in the real world by student teams acting as "consultants" for a sports-related business. In addition, students are exposed to popular contemporary marketing research and analysis techniques such as conjoint analysis to identify optimal product/service bundles and neural networks to engage in data-driven marketing segmentation.

Dr. Bruce Reinig takes a hands-on approach to teaching data management techniques and statistical software to conduct business analytics initiatives and evaluate their performance through a cost-benefit analysis. Students will work on projects that include data collection and preparation, application of techniques such as logistic regression, k-nearest neighbors and cluster analysis (among others), validating their results, and making implementation recommendations. Past students have used the techniques covered in this course to model home field advantages in NCAA basketball and football, analyze Olympic decathlon data to identify underlying performance constructs, predict whether a team will win, lose or tie a sporting competition, and to perform market segmentation to identify opportunities for expansion into new markets.

After completing the 12-month classroom portion of the Sports MBA curriculum, students are prepared to work with a sports organization on a full-time basis. The MBA candidates have a faculty mentor oversee their work during their final semester, with the goal of providing their host organization with a comprehensive consulting report on a specific sports business field at the end of the term. The courses in which the student is enrolled represent a six unit course load, which is carried remotely by many students who choose to pursue a consultancy outside of San Diego. Classes do not meet during this term, so students are encouraged to pursue full-time job opportunities during this portion of the program.

BA 780 Field Studies in Business:

6 Month Internship

BA 795 Integrative Business Analysis:

Final MBA Thesis Report

Concurrent Programs

MBA/JD Program Requirements

Concurrent programs leading to MBA and Juris Doctor degrees are offered through SDSU's partnerships with California Western School of Law (CWSL) and Thomas Jefferson School of Law (TJSL). These concurrent degree programs are designed for students interested in working in fields where law and business converge. Students are expected to apply first to the law program (at either Cal Western or Thomas Jefferson) and then apply to the SDSU MBA program during their first year of law school.

SDSU in partnership with California Western School of Law:

The concurrent degree program allows students to earn a JD from CWSL and an MBA from SDSU in eight semesters of study. Students spend their first year in the JD program at CWSL. Then they join either a Fall or Spring entering class at SDSU and spend two full time semesters at SDSU as part of an MBA first-year class. For the remainder of the program, students take classes at both SDSU and CWSL. Each school grants credit for nine to twelve units taken at the other school. Consequently, if a student earns 77 credits at CWSL and 37 credits at SDSU, he or she can earn enough credits to graduate from both programs in four years. Fewer units are required for the MBA if some core course requirements can be waived. You must complete the requirements for admission and graduation at both. Degrees are awarded concurrently.

CWSL MBA-JD Advising Sheet (pdf)

SDSU in partnership with Thomas Jefferson School of Law:

Students with a non-business undergraduate degree will spend their first year in the JD program at TJSL and the second year at SDSU. Classes will be taken at both institutions the last two years of the programs. Each institution grants credit for up to 12 units taken at the other school, thus eliminating at least one semester from the time it would normally take to complete these two programs separately. A minimum of 30 units and a maximum of 48 units are required for the MBA degree. A minimum of 88 units are required for the JD degree. Students must complete the requirements for admission and graduation at both institutions. Degrees are awarded concurrently.

TJSL MBA-JD Advising Sheet (pdf)

Students in the JD/MBA program follow the business curriculum outlined below:

Core (0 - 21 units):

BA 650 Financial Reporting and Analysis I
BA 651 Organizational Behavior
BA 652 Statistical Analysis
BA 653 Managerial Economics
BA 655 Marketing
BA 662 Operations Management
BA 665 Financial Management I

Theme Course (3 units):

Management of Technology

Field Study (3 units)

Electives (6 - 12 units)

Culminating Experience (3 units):

BA 795 Integrated Business Analysis OR BA 799 Thesis

MBA/MA LAS Program Requirements

SDSU's College of Business Administration and Center for Latin American Studies offer a three-year concurrent program of study leading to a Master of Business Administration and a Master of Arts in Latin American Studies (MBA/MA LAS). The objective of the concurrent program is to offer preparation in the fields of business administration and Latin American studies for the purpose of providing the knowledge and skills necessary to promote and engage in business relationships with the Latin American community in Latin America or in the United States.

Students in the MBA/MA LAS program follow the curriculum outlined below:

Core Courses (3 - 21 units):

BA 650 Financial Reporting and Analysis I
BA 651 Organizational Behavior
BA 652 Statistical Analysis
BA 653 Managerial Economics
BA 655 Marketing
BA 662 Operations Management
BA 665 Financial Management I

Theme Courses (6 units):

Corporate Responsibility
Management of Technology

Business Courses (15 units):

FIN 654 Seminar in International Bus. Finance
MGT 710 Seminar in World Bus. Environment
MGT 723 Seminar in International Strategic Mgmt.
MGT 731 Seminar in Strategic Mgmt. of Tech.
MKTG 769 Seminar in International Marketing

Courses with Latin American Content (24 units):

LATAM 600 - Introduction to Latin American Studies
LATAM 601 - Sem. on Methodology of LA Studies
Electives

MGT 798 Special Study (3 units)

BA 799A - Thesis (3 units)

International Programs (self-support)

Taiwan MBA Program Requirements

SDSU has been offering its graduate business program in Taiwan since 1999. As of 2008, a total of 12 cohort groups have been formed with more than 250 alumni who have graduated from our Taiwan program. It is offered in partnership with U-SWOT Consultants & Co.

The program is designed for working professionals in that classes will meet in intensive residency periods. The residency period consists of all day Saturday and Sunday classes for two consecutive weekends. This class meeting schedule is designed to minimize interference with professional responsibilities.

All courses are taught by full-time faculty from San Diego State University. The program consists of 33 academic units.

Contact: Kamal Haddad Kamal.Haddad@sdsu.edu

Certificate Program (through CES)

Executive Financial Planner Certificate Program Requirements

Highlights

The goal of the Executive Financial Planner Advanced Certificate program is to enable experienced financial services professionals to understand the content material of financial planning with the goal of providing advice based solely on the interests of their clients.

  • 18-month program.
  • Convenient downtown location.
  • Taught by prominent SDSU faculty and seasoned professionals who are experts in financial planning, taxation, estate planning, insurance management and investments.
  • Upon successful completion, participants will be awarded an SDSU Executive Financial Planner Advanced certificate.
  • These courses are taught at the graduate level. If a student becomes a candidate for the Master of Science degree with a concentration in Financial and Tax Planning, courses in this program may count toward their degree with the permission of their adviser. There is a seven year limit on all courses at the time a degree is granted, however.

Federal Taxation of Individuals

ACCT503 Taxation of individuals, including income, deductions, credits, social security taxes and property transactions.

Individual Insurance Management

FIN522 Economic, legal, social and ethical considerations of individual, business and group insurance, including life, health, property, liability and social insurance.

Financial and Retirement Planning

FIN657 Decision-making process and theory of individual financial needs. Retirement planning including social security. Education planning. Financial strategies that aid in meeting family goals.

Seminar in Estate Planning

FIN705 Identification and analysis of those aspects of federal and state law affecting estate planning and taxation.

Seminar in Investments

FIN651 Characteristics of financial markets and instruments; pricing individual securities; portfolio selection and analysis; measurement of risk.

Financial Planning Practicum

FIN 590 Preparation of family financial plans using comprehensive cases and/or real financial data. Financial planning software, counseling and communication skills, behavioral finance, client psychology, practice standards, discipline and ethics.

Classes Meet Weekly, Tuesday Afternoons, 2:30 to 6:00 PM

Location: On Campus at SDSU

Student Services West 2601

Class Date
Estate Planning (FIN 705) August 13, 2013 – October 29, 2013
Investments (FIN 651) November 5, 2013 – February 4, 2014
Federal Taxation (Acct 503) February 11, 2014 – April 29, 2014
Individual Insurance (FIN 522) May 6, 2014 – July 29, 2014
Financial & Retirement Planning (FIN 657) August 5, 2014 – October 21, 2014
Financial Planning Practicum (FIN 590) is the last course. It is taught three times each year (after the completion of the other five class sequence).

Disclosure: SDSU intends to offer the complete series of courses. However, actual offerings of courses depend upon sufficient enrollment and instructor availability. All courses are also offered at the SDSU main campus. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. awards the CFP® certification mark only upon meeting their complete set of requirements. See their Guide to CFP® Certification online.

AACSB accredited

The College of Business Administration is fully accredited by AACSB International – The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business